Video

El impacto de ASSIST en Hospital Infantil Dr. Robert Reid Cabral

Como parte de la respuesta de USAID ante el brote de Zika, ASSIST ha venido implementando esfuerzos para fortalecer el sistema de salud en la República Dominicana. ASSIST ha estado apoyando al Hospital Infantil Dr. Robert Reid Cabral, un hospital pediátrico grande de referencia nacional en Santo Domingo, para mejorar la capacidad que tienen los servicios de salud relacionados al Zika para las mujeres embarazadas, mujeres en edad fértil, recién nacidos afectados por Zika y sus familias.

En este video Dr. Ricardo Elías Melgen, Director General de HIRRC, describe el impacto que ASSIST ha tenido—no solo en los servicios de salud relacionados al Zika sino por todo el hospital.


Mirar el video Combating Zika: Hope for Teanny's Future de USAID (en español con subtítulos en inglés) para escuchar la historia de una familia recibiendo cuidado y apoyo en el Hospital Robert Reid por su hija afectada por Zika.

Combating Zika: Hope for Teanny's Future

Arianny Polanco was diagnosed with Zika while pregnant with her daughter, Teanny, who was born with microcephaly, a birth defect linked with the virus. USAID is strengthening health services to prevent Zika and provide care and support to affected families. As part of USAID’s Zika response, the USAID ASSIST Project is providing support to the hospital where Teanny receives therapy, Hospital Pediatrico el Robert Reid Cabral in the Dominican Republic, to improve the quality of care that she receives.

By working in Latin America and the Caribbean to control the spread of Zika, USAID is helping reduce travel-related infections and keeping citizens in the United States safe and healthy, while reducing the devastating impacts in affected countries.


This video was produced by USAID through the support of the American people and in coordination with implementing partners ASSIST, UNICEF, and Pastoral Materno Infantil. It is available on USAID’s YouTube channel.

 

Guidance for Improving Family Planning/HIV Integration Service Delivery for Adolescent Girls and Young Women

PEPFAR-funded programs for vulnerable children and adolescents are assessed using the Site Improvement Monitoring System (SIMS) to ensure that programs are meeting minimum standards and providing quality services to vulnerable children and families. In the orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) domain, SIMS covers many core essential elements (CEE), including Family Planning/HIV Integration Service Delivery in Community Settings. This CEE standard requires that “each service delivery point supporting services for this population provides access to high quality family planning (FP) education and services, directly or through referrals.”

Accessing quality FP/HIV services improves health outcomes among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) as it leads to preventing unwanted pregnancies especially among sexually active girls younger than 18 years. It also is a critical step in managing cases of sexual abuse within the first 72 hours to prevent unwanted pregnancy and exposure to new HIV infections. The USAID ASSIST Project is developing resources to help service delivery partners not only meet the requirements of the CEE but to better understand the key steps and best practices involved in implementing FP/HIV Integration programs for OVC.

This presentation by Dr. Diana Chamrad of URC and Dr. Taroub Faramand of WI-HER, LLC, developed for the 2017 Africa Psychosocial Support Forum in Arusha, Tanzania, describes:

  • Why family planning/HIV integration is critical for adolescent girls and young women (AGYW)
  • How the quality improvement (QI) process can help implementers effectively integrate quality FP/HIV services
  • A case example of FP/HIV integration in the DREAMS Initiative in Northern Uganda
  • Tools developed to support delivery of high-quality FP/HIV services for adolescent girls and young women in community settings

 

VIDEO: The Story of Baby Miracle

Baby Miracle was born at a mere 25 weeks, after her mother experienced a complication during the pregnancy.  This video highlights the timely and life-saving care that both mother and baby received due improvements in care initiated by the Regional Learning Network within Hoima Regional Referral Hospital catchment area in Western Uganda.

The Regional Learning Network (RLN) was designed to provide coordinated newborn health services across standard and specialized newborn care. It was conceived of as a network of health facilities including and within the catchment area of the Hoima Regional Referral Hospital (RRH) that are linked through an improvement collaborative to provide high-quality maternal and newborn services based on national evidence-based standards and guidelines. 

The network was established in 2016 in response to a MOH request, as part of a collaboration between Save the Children’s Saving Newborn Lives (SNL) program and the Center for Human Services/University Research Co., LLC (CHS/URC).

VIDEO: Uganda Regional Learning Network

Overview

The Regional Learning Network in Uganda was designed to provide coordinated newborn health services across two levels of care:

  • standard newborn care (Health Centers III and IV and the District Hospital) and
  • specialized care (Regional Referral Hospital).

The Regional Learning Network was conceived of as a network of health facilities including and within the catchment area of the Hoima Regional Referral Hospital (RRH) that are linked through an improvement collaborative to provide high quality MNH services based on national evidence-based standards and guidelines.  The network was established in 2016 in Western Uganda, in response to a MOH request, as part of a collaboration between Save the Children’s Saving Newborn Lives (SNL) program and the Center for Human Services/University Research Co., LLC (CHS/URC).

More about the Regional Learning Network

  • The Regional Learning Network included one Regional Referral Hospital, 4 hospitals, 6 health centers (HCs) IVs, and 3 HCs III located in Hoima, Kiboga, Kyankwanzi, Buliisa, Masindi and Kiryandongo districts.
  • Each facility in the network had a quality improvement (QI) team that addressed gaps in the quality of maternal and newborn care through rapid testing of changes to care delivery. Teams were supported through regular coaching and mentorship visits by URC/CHS and district coaches. QI teams measured improvement against performance monitoring indicators defined by MOH and WHO guidelines and shared progress against these indicators at quarterly learning sessions.
  • The learning component of the Regional Learning Network was aimed at building MNH clinical knowledge and skills through the establishment of a Skills/Learning lab at the Regional Referral Hospital. In May 2017, operation and management of the learning lab was handed over to the Hoima Regional Referral Hospital.

 

Retooling Minds, Dignifying Lives: Think One Egg per Child per Month

This short video tells the story of a young man involved in the "one egg per child" scheme. Through this, he sells eggs and has been able to pay his school fees and open a bank account to save money.

The Watano Initiative: Quality Improvement for Productive Support Groups

This short video tells the experience of a caregiver in Kenya who was involved in the Wantano Initiative. She explains how her involvement led to her being able to save money and care for her grandchildren.

Why it is Important to Sex-Disaggregate Data in Quality Improvement

The USAID ASSIST Project integrates gender considerations in quality improvement in order to improve outcomes for all — women and men, girls and boys. This video explains a critical part of gender integration in detail: collecting and analyzing sex-disaggregated data.

Learn more about the importance of gender integration in monitoring and evaluation, and sex-disaggregated data in particular.

La prise en charge de l’anémie chez les femmes enceintes, allaitantes et les enfants de moins de 5 ans (in French)

Selon l’Enquête Démographique et de Santé EDSM- V, la région de Sikasso affiche une situation nutritionnelle préoccupante avec des taux de malnutrition aigüe globale souvent dépassant le seuil d’alerte. Toutes choses qui ont causé un taux élevé d’anémie chez les femmes enceintes et les enfants de moins de 5 ans, occasionnant un risque élevé de mortalité maternelle, néo-natale et infantile. Face à cette situation qui pénalise le développement de toute une nation,  l’USAID à travers le projet ASSIST a décidé avec la sollicitude du Ministère de la santé et de l’hygiène publique, d’agir dans la région de Sikasso notamment dans le district sanitaire de Bougouni pour la prévention et la prise en charge de l’anémie chez les femmes enceintes, allaitantes et les enfants de moins de 5 ans. Le projet travaille en étroite collaboration avec les services du Ministère de la Santé et de l’hygiène Publique. Pour assurer la mise en œuvre des activités, le projet a mis en place une approche d’amélioration de la qualité qui consiste à mettre en réseau les Equipes d’amélioration de la Qualité (EAQ) au niveau des centres de santé et au niveau communautaire. Dans la région de Sikasso et principalement dans le district sanitaire de Bougouni, les activités du projet ont porté sur la prévention et le contrôle de l’anémie dans 44 centres de santé et au sein de 42 communautés. Au niveau des agents de santé, plusieurs activités de renforcement de capacité ont été initiées notamment la formation, le coaching et les sessions d’apprentissage. Une approche innovante.

Pour son volet communautaire, les comités communautaires constituent des groupes de femmes déjà organisés et fonctionnels dans les villages, se regroupant de façon régulière pour échanger et se conseiller mutuellement. Le projet utilise ces groupes en renforçant leurs capacités pour assurer la sensibilisation sur l’anémie, son dépistage et la référence des cas dépistés vers les centres de santé  pour une prise en charge correcte et rapide. Ces comités, par leur propre initiative, ont développé beaucoup de stratégies comme l’instauration de jardins communautaires et privés, des théâtres, des sketchs des poèmes, des  chants entre autres…des initiatives qui ont fait de chaque habitant même les tous petits de véritables agents sanitaires.

Après plus de 3 ans de mise en œuvre donc, il est indéniable que le projet USAID ASSIST, au regard des succès enregistrés au niveau des centres de santé et des comités communautaires a fait du chemin pour l’atteinte de son idéal. Selon le médecin chef du district sanitaire de Bougouni, l’avènement du projet USAIS ASSSIT avec son approche innovante est une aubaine pour la vie sanitaire des populations. Ces réussites sont une illustration parfaite de l’approche changement de comportement et d’une garantie d’impact à long terme.

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Management of anemia in pregnant women and children under 5 years of age

This short film discusses the project’s contribution at the community level with interviews from community members, families, providers and decision makers on project results and achievements in the health district of Bougouni in the Sikasso region of Mali.

According to the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), the Sikasso region has a worrying nutritional status with overall acute malnutrition rates. There is a high rate of anemia in pregnant women and children under 5 years, causing a high risk of maternal, neonatal and infant mortality. Hence, at the request of the Ministry of Health and Public Hygiene, USAID decided to work, through the USAID ASSIST project, on the prevention and management of anemia in pregnant and lactating women and children under 5 years of age in the region of Sikasso. In order to ensure the implementation of the activities, ASSIST has put in place a quality improvement approach which consists of Quality Improvement Teams (QAs) at the health center and community level. In the Sikasso region and mainly in the health district of Bougouni, the project activities focused on the prevention and control of anemia in 44 health centers and in 42 communities. At the level of health workers, several capacity-building activities were initiated, including training, coaching and learning sessions.


For additional information about ASSIST work reducing anemia in Mali:
Synthèse des bonnes pratiques de la mise en oeuvre de l’approche d’amélioration de la qualité appliquée à l’anémie au Mali

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIDEO: El abordaje de seis pasos para identificar y cerrar las brechas relacionadas con el género

Este video en español se presenta nuestro abordaje de seis pasos para identificar y cerrar las brechas relacionadas con el género. ASSIST utiliza un abordaje holístico para integrar el género durante el mejoramiento de la calidad de atención en salud. WI-HER, LLC ha desarrollado un abordaje innovador y efectivo de seis pasos para ayudar a los equipos de ASSIST en la integración del género en las actividades de mejoramiento y para identificar y cerrar brechas relacionadas con el género. Este método se ha probado en varios programas de ASSIST y ha logrado mejorar la utilización de los servicios y la retención en la atención y ha contribuido a la reducción de los eventos adversos. En este video, Dr. Taroub Harb Faramand de WI-HER, LLC explica cada uno de los seis pasos utilizando ejemplos de la vida real. Ella muestra que si se implementan las intervenciones de mejoramiento sin considerar la dinámica del género, se corre el riesgo de no alcanzar a la mitad de la población la cual puede explotar o hacer daño a uno de los géneros, sin intentar de hacerlo.

Hay video explicando el mismo abordaje En Français // In English.

Un afiche explicando nuestra abordaje en español está disponible aquí.

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