Community Health

Community Health System

As the complex needs of people facing the double burden of health issues and socio-economic difficulties are increasingly identified and addressed, the importance of community-level health and social services is magnified. Improvement methods can be applied at the community level to address the quality and coverage of health and social welfare services, strengthen linkages between the community and the health system, and enhance the capacity of existing groups and networks to affect health issues in their own communities. 

A particular area of focus for improvement in community health is to strengthen the effectiveness and sustainability of programs that rely on community health workers (CHWs). Due to large catchment areas and numbers of households they are expected to cover, CHWs are frequently inadequate to provide services to all households needing them.  Although CHWs are usually linked to facilities, facility health care teams often do not have the time or capacity to address the challenges facing CHWs. Leveraging existing networks and indigenous structures to work together to improve the health of community members can improve CHWs’ acceptance, morale, and performance.

Making Community Systems the Bedrock of Global Health Investments

ICHC Blog Series

This post is part of the Institutionalizing Community Health Conference blog series.

By: Kate Thomson, Head of Community Rights and Gender Department, Global Fund

Above: Tibre Desu is one of 38,000 female health extension workers trained by the Government of Ethiopia, with support from the Global Fund, to bring basic health care closer to people’s homes. (The Global Fund / Petterik Wiggers)

Strong Government Leadership & Management are Key to Building Sustainable Community Health Systems

ICHC Blog Series

This post is part of the Institutionalizing Community Health Conference blog series.

By: Kiersten Abate, Senior Program Associate, AMP Health

(Photo courtesy of Mike Park/AMP Health)

This blog originally appeared on The Huffington Post.

Communities: The key to unlocking better health for every child

ICHC Blog Series

This post is part of the Institutionalizing Community Health Conference blog series.

By: Stefan Peterson Chief of Health Section for UNICEF globally / Professor of Global Health at Uppsala University, Sweden

Mother and baby in Malawi. (Courtesy of Guido Dingemans/Jhpiego)

Community-Based Maternal Health Care: Meeting Women Where They Are

ICHC Blog Series

This post is part of the Institutionalizing Community Health Conference blog series.

By: Sarah Hodin Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Mother and newborn in Ghana. (Courtesy of Kate Holt/Jhpiego)

Transforming the Community Health Landscape: From Alma Ata to the Institutionalizing Community Health Conference

ICHC Blog Series

This post is part of the Institutionalizing Community Health Conference blog series.

By: Nazo Kureshy, Community Health Team Leader, USAID and Jerome Pfaffmann Zambruni, Health Specialist / Child Health Unit, UNICEF

(Courtesy of Nazo Kureshy/USAID)

Institutionalizing Community Health Conference

Johannesburg, South Africa
Online
Worldwide

Listening to the voices of community health workers

Donna Bjerregaard

Senior Technical Advisor, Initiatives Inc.

In 1505, the Polish Parliament stated, "Nothing new without the common consent." Today we understand that ‘nothing about us without us’ is the rallying cry for inclusion and change.    

Community improvers impress district and national officials in Mahalapye, Botswana

Cecil Haverkamp

Chief of Party, Botswana, USAID ASSIST/URC


Participants in a Community Improvement Learning Session in Botswana. Photo by URC.

Strengthening HIV linkage and retention through improved community/facility collaboration in Palla Road, Botswana

This ASSIST case study describes how the community improvement team in Palla Road village worked with facility staff to figure out how to leverage existing community platforms and resources to locate patients who were lost to follow-up (LTFU) and return to HIV care at the local facility.

Using Collaborative Improvement to Enhance Postpartum Family Planning in Niger

The report describes the ASSIST project intervention in 16 facilities in Niger that led to an improvement in postpartum family planning (PPFP) quality and uptake, and adherence with selected FP methods of choice. The intervention, which happened over a period of eight months, also contributed to the reduction of unmet FP need and achieving healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies (HTSP).

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