Community Health

Community Health System

As the complex needs of people facing the double burden of health issues and socio-economic difficulties are increasingly identified and addressed, the importance of community-level health and social services is magnified. Improvement methods can be applied at the community level to address the quality and coverage of health and social welfare services, strengthen linkages between the community and the health system, and enhance the capacity of existing groups and networks to affect health issues in their own communities. 

A particular area of focus for improvement in community health is to strengthen the effectiveness and sustainability of programs that rely on community health workers (CHWs). Due to large catchment areas and numbers of households they are expected to cover, CHWs are frequently inadequate to provide services to all households needing them.  Although CHWs are usually linked to facilities, facility health care teams often do not have the time or capacity to address the challenges facing CHWs. Leveraging existing networks and indigenous structures to work together to improve the health of community members can improve CHWs’ acceptance, morale, and performance.

Our “Best 9” stories in 2017

Vicky Ramirez

Consultant, USAID ASSIST Project/URC

Looking back, 2017 was a great year for us at USAID ASSIST. In 2017, we were featured in USAID’s Exposure; we collaborated with a number of partners to publish ICHC Blog Series, which was cross-posted on The Huffington Post; and we ran a blog series in honor of Health Worker Week. After our resources page, our blog was the most visited page on our website. In case you missed some of these highlights, we’ve put together our “Best 9” stories. These posts illustrate the stories behind the great work employed by our country teams, partners, and individuals. Let us know which story you loved the most!

Saving Mothers Giving Life: A Northern Uganda Photo Story

The Saving Mothers Giving Life (SMGL) project was a five year (2012-2017) private–public partnership (PPP) aimed at rapidly reducing maternal and newborn mortality in selected districts of Uganda, Zambia, and Nigeria. In Uganda, which has a maternal mortality ratio of 438/100,000 live births (UDHS, 2011), the ASSIST project provided continuous quality improvement support to the 12 month SMGL proof of concept phase in the four districts of Western Uganda (Kyenjojo, Kamwenge, Kabarole and Kibaale).

Working with peer mothers to improve retention of mother-baby pairs in care

Engagement of peer mothers to support retention of mother-baby pairs in care, as well as to support newly diagnosed HIV positive pregnant women to remain in care during antenatal care (ANC) is a relatively new concept in the Northern region of Uganda. Two key emerging roles of the peer mothers include coordination of the HIV positive mothers’ savings groups and the involvement of male partners in care.

Guide to Using the Community Client Led ART Delivery Model in Uganda

Achieving the UNAIDS 90–90–90 targets calls for the adoption of innovative and efficient strategies for delivering HIV and prevention, care, and treatment services that address the needs of different sub-populations of clients under HIV care. Programmatic adaptations for delivering HIV and TB prevention and care services based on patients’ needs are referred to as differentiated HIV and TB service delivery models’.

Improving Care for Orphans and Vulnerable Children and Families: Experiences from implementation in Kenya

This is a compilation of products created with support from the USAID Applying Science to Strengthen and Improve Systems project (ASSIST) in Kenya based on the experience of applying quality improvement methods to improve quality of services for orphans and vulnerable children. This project was implemented between 2013 to September 2017.

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