Community Health

Community Health System

As the complex needs of people facing the double burden of health issues and socio-economic difficulties are increasingly identified and addressed, the importance of community-level health and social services is magnified. Improvement methods can be applied at the community level to address the quality and coverage of health and social welfare services, strengthen linkages between the community and the health system, and enhance the capacity of existing groups and networks to affect health issues in their own communities. 

A particular area of focus for improvement in community health is to strengthen the effectiveness and sustainability of programs that rely on community health workers (CHWs). Due to large catchment areas and numbers of households they are expected to cover, CHWs are frequently inadequate to provide services to all households needing them.  Although CHWs are usually linked to facilities, facility health care teams often do not have the time or capacity to address the challenges facing CHWs. Leveraging existing networks and indigenous structures to work together to improve the health of community members can improve CHWs’ acceptance, morale, and performance.

It takes a village: Partnerships to strengthen the system of regulation of health professions in Cambodia

Alyson Smith

Senior Advisor for Health Professions Regulation, USAID ASSIST Project

Silvia Holschneider

Senior Improvement Advisor for Reporting and Deliverables, USAID ASSIST Project

April 2 - 8, 2017 marks World Health Worker Week. We're honoring health workers in this blog series. Today's theme is "Partnerships."  

In Cambodia, each health profession is regulated by their respective independent Council—the Medical Council of Cambodia, the Dental Council of Cambodia, the Cambodian Midwives Council, the Cambodian Council of Nurses, and the Pharmacy Council of Cambodia. Since 2000, these councils have played an important quality and safety role through registration of qualified health professionals, making sure that they maintain registration, establish the codes and standards of professional practice and investigate complaints about matters relating to a health professional’s health, performance or professional conduct.

Empowering women health care workers through quality improvement

Taroub Faramand

Founder and President, WI-HER, LLC

(Staff at an ASSIST-supported health facility. Photo by Taroub Faramand, WI-HER, LLC)

Laying the groundwork for healthy communities

By: Thapelo Manale, Kesa Dikgole, and Cecil Haverkamp

(Ms. Thalitha Tiro presenting results of improvement efforts by the Boikanyo community team in Gaborone. Photo by URC Botswana)

Maximizing the return on investment in the health workforce: The role of quality improvement

Lani Marquez

Knowledge Management Director, USAID ASSIST Project/URC

(Midwives in Niger. Photo by Lauren Crigler.)

April 2 - 8, 2017 marks World Health Worker Week. We're honoring health workers in this blog series. Today's theme is "Economic Returns."  

ICHC 2017: Five Key Takeaways for Maternal Health

ICHC Blog Series

This post is part of the Institutionalizing Community Health Conference blog series.

By: The Maternal Health Task Force

(Courtesy of Max Marx/MCSP)

Reaching the “last mile” in South Sudan with community health workers

ICHC Blog Series

This post is part of the Institutionalizing Community Health Conference blog series.

By: Dr. Alfonso Rosales, MD, MPH-TM, World Vision

A mother holds her two-month-old baby at home in South Sudan. (Courtesy of Kate Holt, Jhpiego)

This blog orginally appeared on The Huffington Post.​

Using Quality Improvement Approaches for Better Community Health

ICHC Blog Series

This post is part of the Institutionalizing Community Health Conference blog series.

By: Kim Ethier Stover, Senior Quality Improvement Advisor, USAID ASSIST Project

Women and children in Ethiopia (Jhpiego)

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