Vulnerable Children & Families

School Children in Nigeria

Due to the long-term effects of HIV, AIDS and poverty, many countries are home to increasing numbers of vulnerable children requiring care and support beyond what can be provided by their families. Government, civil society, and the international donor community have attempted to fill those gaps in care and support through the provision of services to millions of at-risk children. Standardizing the delivery of child and family welfare services is a first step toward achieving a systemic and sustained response to the needs of vulnerable children and families. Improvement methods can help national coordinating bodies and implementing partners to develop and put in practice outcomes-oriented standards for vulnerable children and family services. Improvement methods can also test models to support and strengthen government capacity to protect most vulnerable children--those at risk of or living outside of family care.

Our “Best 9” stories in 2017

Vicky Ramirez

Consultant, USAID ASSIST Project/URC

Looking back, 2017 was a great year for us at ASSIST. In 2017, we were featured in USAID’s Exposure; we collaborated with a number of partners to publish ICHC Blog Series, which was cross-posted on The Huffington Post; and we ran a blog series in honor of Health Worker Week. After our resources page, our blog was the most visited page on our website. In case you missed some of these highlights, we’ve put together our “Best 9” stories. These posts illustrate the stories behind the great work employed by our country teams, partners, and individuals. Let us know which story you loved the most!

Improving educational performance of children in Chilore Primary school using quality improvement approaches in Mangochi District, Malawi

A team of community volunteers and government extension workers, with support from USAID, from 16 villages in Namwera, Mangochi District used quality improvement (QI) methods to mobilise four primary schools and their 16 surrounding communities to improve the performance of vulnerable children in the four primary schools. In December 2013, the community QI team assessed the wellbeing of a sample of 132 vulnerable children. The Child Status Index (CSI) assessment revealed that 70% of the poor scores were on education performance, food insecurity, and shelter conditions.

National Psychosocial Support Guidelines for Orphans and Vulnerable Children in Kenya

These guidelines were developed for use by front line child service providers to streamline psychosocial support services for children. The guidelines provide guidance for supporting caregivers, general guidance for children of all ages, and specific guidance by age range: 0-5, 6-13, and 14-18. An implementation framework is also included.

Improving Care for Orphans and Vulnerable Children and Families: Experiences from implementation in Kenya

This is a compilation of products created with support from the USAID Applying Science to Strengthen and Improve Systems project (ASSIST) in Kenya based on the experience of applying quality improvement methods to improve quality of services for orphans and vulnerable children. This project was implemented between 2013 to September 2017.

2017 REPSSI Forum: Equity, Equality for all Girls, Boys and Youth

Arusha, Tanzania

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