Zika

The recent emergence and rapid spread of the Zika virus presents a grave, new challenge for health systems and practitioners across the Zika-affected regions, as they work to address the unique health needs and concerns of individuals and families affected by the epidemic.

Zika is spread primarily through the Aedes mosquito – the same species of mosquito that spreads dengue and chikungunya – but the virus can also be transmitted via sexual contact. Common symptoms of Zika for an otherwise healthy adult include mild fever, skin rash, conjunctivitis, muscle and joint pain, malaise or headache, lasting up to a week.However, most concerning for health workers is that Zika is passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus during pregnancy.

While the symptoms for an adult are mild, Zika infection during pregnancy can have grave consequences for the growing fetus. Zika infection during pregnancy has been linked to an increase in birth defects across the Zika-affected regions, particularly a serious birth defect called microcephaly, which results in unusually small heads and brain damage in newborns.

As part of USAID’s Zika response, ASSIST has been implementing health systems strengthening efforts in Latin America and the Caribbean to provide targeted support to health systems affected by the Zika virus. ASSIST is working to improve the capacity of Zika-related health services to deliver consistent, evidence-based, respectful, high-quality care—with a focus on pregnant women, newborns, and women of reproductive age.

To learn more about our work improving care in Zika, read this overview and explore our Zika resources and publications below.

In addition to the resources provided here, ASSIST maintains a website in Spanish with exclusively Zika-related content: www.maternoinfantil.org/zika.

Zika webinar series - Engaging Communities and Leaders Towards Behavior Change Using a Social Behavior Change Strategy

Online

The USAID Zika team in collaboration with GHPoD is putting on a webinar series to highlight accomplishments and lessons learned from partners across the Zika response.  Please join us for a presentation by Carla Sanchez from the CAZ project (Save the Children) , who will discuss a behavioral framework, and it’s adaptation, validation, and implementation at the country levels of the CAZ project (El Salvador, Honduras, Dominican Republic). The strategy helped to guide activity development per audience groups, trainings of trainers and community volunteers, and SBCC material development.

Zika webinar series: Improving Care and Support for Zika Affected Infants and Mothers: The Experience of the ASSIST Project in 13 LAC Countries

The USAID Zika team in collaboration with GHPoD is putting on a webinar series to highlight accomplishments and lessons learned from partners across the Zika response.  During the second webinar in the series, a  presentation by Graciela Avila and Diana Chamrad from the ASSIST project discussed the importance of finding women and children affected by Zika to assure that needed services (e.g., psychosocial support) are available and linked across the health system.

When: October 2, 2019 at 12 P.M. EST

Involucramiento del hombre en la prevención de la infección del Zika en Honduras

El estudio de caso describe las actividades desarrolladas por el personal del hospital de Tela en la Región de Atlántida, Honduras, para involucrar a los hombres en la prevención de la infección del virus del Zika y sus complicaciones. Una...

Involving Men in the Prevention of ZIka in Honduras

This case study describes activities carried out by personnel of the Tela Hospital, in the Atlántida Region of Honduras to involve men in the prevention of the Zika virus and its complications. One of the limitations of the strategy of...

Zika webinar series - Why It’s Critical to Strengthen a Public Health Emergency Response with Quality Improvement (QI): What We Learned Implementing QI in the Zika Response

Online

On September 25th, the USAID Zika team in collaboration with GHPoD hosted the first in a webinar series to highlight accomplishments and lessons learned from partners across the response.  There were presentations by Dr. M. Rashad Massoud, Senior Vice President, and Dr. Jorge Hermida, Regional Director for Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean, from the USAID ASSIST project titled Why It’s Critical to Strengthen a Public Health Emergency Response with Quality Improvement (QI): What We Learned Implementing QI in the Zika Response. Dr. Massoud and Dr.

Utilización de condones por mujeres embarazadas y sus parejas para evitar la transmisión sexual del Zika en Guatemala

Este breve informe presenta los resultados de dos rondas de monitoreo de la utilización de condones reportada por mujeres embarazadas que asistieron a la atención prenatal en 37 establecimientos de salud del segundo y tercer nivel de...

Informe Resumen de las Actividades del Proyecto de USAID “Aplicando la Ciencia a Fortalecer y Mejorar los Sistemas de Salud” en el Paraguay

El proyecto de la Agencia de Estados Unidos para el Desarrollo Internacional (USAID) “Aplicando la Ciencia para Fortalecer y Mejorar los Sistemas de Salud” (ASSIST) en Paraguay se enfocó en tres áreas estratégicas: el desarrollo y...

Summary Report of the Activities of the USAID Applying Science to Strengthen and Improve Systems Project in Nicaragua

In Nicaragua, technical assistance activities in response to the Zika epidemic began in 2017, both in health training institutions, universities, and in institutions providing health services to the population, the establishments of the...

Informe Resumen de las Actividades del Proyecto de USAID “Aplicando la Ciencia para Fortalecer y Mejorar los Sistemas de Salud” en Nicaragua

En Nicaragua, las actividades de asistencia técnica en respuesta a la epidemia de Zika se iniciaron en el año 2017, tanto en las instituciones formadoras de recursos para la salud, es decir universidades, como en las instituciones...

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